#Idiom: Stick-in-the-Mud/Fuddy-Duddy/Old Fogey

My blog post last week was about a difficult subject, the American Civil War. I decided to write about a less serious topic today.

I was driving to one of my favorite places (the public library) recently, when the expression “stick-in-the-mud” flew into my head out of nowhere. I don’t have a clue what brought that on unless it was all the rain we’d had that week and our yard had turned into a sea of mud. Who knows how the human brain works?

When I got home, I thought: blog post! My research led me to idioms meaning essentially the same thing as stick-in-the-mud. Those others are “fuddy-duddy” and “old fogey.”

stick-in-the-mud
Photo credit: Annie Spratt on unsplash.com

When were they first used?

One source says “stick-in-the-mud” was used as early as 1700, while Merriam-Webster attributes

it’s advent to 1832. English Through the Ages, by William Brohaugh says 1735.

Merriam-Webster says “fuddy-duddy” originated in 1904, while William Brohaugh’s book says

it came into general usage in 1905.

Merriam-Webster says “fogey” dates back to 1780. William Brohaugh agrees.

What does it mean?

All three of these idioms are colorful ways to insult someone for being old-fashioned, stuck in their ways, slow to accept change, etc.

Some examples of how the idiom is used

Don’t be such a stick-in-the-mud!

Don’t be a fuddy-duddy!

Get with the program. You’re being a stick-in-the-mud.

As language loses its color

#stick-in-the-mud
Photo credit: Joseph J. Cotten on unsplash.com

I’m sad to report that “fuddy-duddy,” “fogey,” and “old fogey” did not make the cut when The American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms, by Christine Ammer was published in 1997. I guess that means I’m a fuddy-duddy and an old fogey for even including those expressions in today’s blog.

It’s idioms like “stick in the mud” that make the English language interesting. A synonym for it is “antediluvian,” but I much prefer “stick-in-the-mud.” Don’t you?

A question for multilinguals

For those of you who are fluent in languages other than English, do you know of a colorful idiom for antediluvian in another language?

A question for my friends and relatives

Are people calling me a stick-in-the-mud, a fuddy-duddy, or an old fogey behind my back? I hope not!

Since my last blog post

The spring weather has been beautiful! Our yard is ablaze with azalea blossoms and irises. I enjoyed doing a little yardwork, and I have stiff joints now to prove it. I also have poison oak on my face and arm to prove it, although I thought I was being careful to avoid it.

Until my next blog post

If you’re new to my blog, you might like to read my earlier posts about idioms: #Idioms: Reading the Riot Act on January 25, 2021, and #Idioms: As All Get Out on March 29, 2021.

I hope you have a good book to read. I’m listening to The Lost Girls of Paris, by Pam Jenoff, and I’m reading The Good Sister, by Sally Hepworth.

I hope you have time for a hobby this week.

I hope the Covid-19 pandemic is getting under control where you live.

Janet