#TwoForTuesday: Two Books that Encourage a Change

Today’s #TwoForTuesday writing prompt made me look over the list of books I’ve read since October, 1993 (when I started keeping a list) and select two books that encourage change.

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying, by Marie Kondo

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, by Marie Kondo

I read this book four years ago this month. It immediately inspired me to reorganize my dresser drawers. I changed the way I stored many of my garments. It made seeing and finding what I had easier.

Marie Kondo’s mantra is, “Does it spark joy?” If an item doesn’t bring you joy, she says it needs to go. I went through my clothes and some kitchen items asking myself that question, and it felt good to donate some things to Goodwill where they could bring someone else joy.

Reading the book a couple of months before a kitchen remodel helped me part with some pots, pans, and dishes that held sentimental value because they had belonged to my mother. One thing I learned was that I don’t need the chipped or cracked bowl to remember Mama’s potato salad, and I don’t need her beat up pots and pans to remember the delicious meals she lovingly prepared for us.

Ms. Kondo says one must tidy by category, not location. I tend to want to tidy a room and then move on to another room (or not move on, as the case may be.) She says to start with clothing, then books, then paper. I think that’s where the wheels fell off my wagon. Paper is the bane of my existence. As much as I recycle and try to depend on technology, I’m still overwhelmed by paper.

Four years later, I need to read the book again. I think it will encourage me to donate or discard some things that have accumulated since April of 2015. Why should I keep it if it can bring joy to someone else?

I plan to read this book again. After four years and the gaining of a few pounds, it’s time to sort through my clothes again, donate more books to a charity used book sale, and take that giant step into all that paper that seems to multiply while I’m asleep.

52 Small Changes:  One Year to a Happier, Healthier You, by Brett Blumenthal

52 Small Changes: One Year to a Happier, Healthier You, by Brett Blumenthal

I read this book 15 months ago. The idea is that you make a small change in your life every week for 52 weeks. At the end of that year, you’ve theoretically incorporated all those changes into your daily life and lifestyle.

The author says it’s easier to make small changes than major changes. Also, it take time to make a permanent change in your life. A study done by University College London psychologist Phillippa Lally found that it take an average of 9½ weeks to make a lasting change.

I might give this book another chance, even though the first change is a major one for me:  “Drink an adequate amount of water each day to maintain a healthy level of hydration.” Water is not my favorite beverage but, starting today, I’ll make an effort to drink more of it. The rule of thumb is:  “Drink the amount of water in ounces that equals your weight in pounds divided by two.”

Maybe that Week One change will inspire me to lose some weight. The less I weigh, the less water I need to drink! Week Two isn’t any easier:  “Get seven to eight hours of restful sleep every night.” I’m afraid to look at the third week.

Until my next blog post

Thank you, Rae, of “Rae’s Reads and Reviews Blog” for this month’s #TwoForTuesday blog post prompts. Visit her blog at https://educatednegra.blog/2019/04/01/two-for-tuesday-participants-4/ to read Rae’s blog in which she gave a link to her list of prompts for the Tuesdays in April.

Happy reading!

Let’s continue the conversation

In the comments section below, tell me about two books you can think of that encourage change.

Janet

Left in the Dust by Social Media

Photo by Wynand Uys on Unsplash

I’ve blogged before about my love/hate relationship with social media. Most of the forms of social media take me out of my comfort zone. Actually, that is an understatement.

Blogging

I enjoy blogging and interacting with people who read my posts. I follow a lot of blogs and have benefited from them. I learn from them, I’m inspired by them, and I’m entertained by them. 

Facebook

Facebook comes in a distant second place. I really don’t need to see a picture of what you ate for breakfast. The most redeeming qualities of Facebook are that it gives me an easy way to stay in touch with friends in Europe and family around the United States, and it gives me a way to know the political leanings of some of my Facebook friends so I’ll know what I can or cannot say to them in order to keep them as friends.

The down side is that I’ve learned things I wish I hadn’t about some of my friends. Suffice it to say, if the topic of politics is going to come up at my next high school reunion or family gathering, I don’t want to be there.

Pinterest

I like Pinterest, but I haven’t put enough time into it to make it a productive platform for my writing. I spend more time on Pinterest than I should, but not necessarily to promote my writing. I pin many articles to my “The Writing Life” board, but I use it more for the hobbies I enjoy.

Twitter

I’m sure this sounds blasphemous to the young adults who might read this post, but I’m not much of a cell phone person. I could really do without it. I refuse to be ruled by a phone. I don’t want to be tied to a phone. I don’t want a phone to monopolize my time, energy, or attention. I want a phone available for emergencies – and I mean the old-timey understanding of what an emergency is.

Instagram

I set up an account a couple of years ago and never took the next step. Again, it’s related to my cell phone and its built-in camera. I’m sure it’s convenient for many people. I just don’t get it.

All the Social Media I’ve not heard of

I guess that’s self-explanatory.

Since my last blog post

I’ve had a net gain of 4,550 words to my The Doubloon manuscript, bringing my current word count to 55,400. I get to start on Chapter 14 today. I can’t wait!

Until my next blog post

I hope you have a good book to read. Nothing grabbed my attention last week. I had to return The Irishman’s Daughter, by V.S. Alexander to the public library without finishing it. I’m on the waitlist for it again so I can finish reading it on my Kindle. Part of the problem is how tired my eyes get reading regular size print. On my Kindle I can adjust the font size. This historical novel is set in Ireland during the potato famine.

If you’re a writer, I hope you have productive writing time.

Look for my #TwoForTuesday blog post tomorrow: ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­“Two Books that Encourage Change.” Thank you for providing the writing prompt, Rae, in “Rae’s Reads and Reviews” blog. Here’s a link to her April 1, 2019 blog post in which she listed all the #TwoForTuesday prompts for the month of April: https://educatednegra.blog/2019/04/. Thank you for reading my blog. You could have spent the last few minutes doing something else, but you chose to read my blog.

In my blog on Monday, April 29, 2019 I’ll explain what triggered today’s rant.

Let’s continue the conversation

What’s your favorite of all the social media? What’s your least favorite? Share your thoughts in the comments section below.

Janet

Anna Jean Mayhew’s Tomorrow’s Bread Reading and Book Signing

Anna Jean Mayhew, author of The Dry Grass of August and Tomorrow’s Bread

If you’ve been following my blog for a few years, you know I love nothing better than attending an author’s book reading and signing. After not getting to one in a long time, on April 4, 2019 I had the pleasure of attending Anna Jean Mayhew’s at Park Road Books in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Ms. Mayhew’s second novel, Tomorrow’s Bread, was published on March 26, 2019. I shared my thoughts about the book in my April 1, 2019 blog post, https://janetswritingblog.com/2019/04/01/this-is-not-an-april-fools-day-joke/.

I thoroughly enjoyed her reading at Park Road Books. She read selected excerpts from the book and talked about the three narrators. She also played a song written specifically in conjunction with Tomorrow’s Bread and had copies of the words for all in attendance.

If you’d like to listen to the song and see the accompanying artwork, go to http://shari-smith.com/trio-2019/ and scroll down to Tomorrow’s Bread. The song and artwork came together with Ms. Mayhew’s book through the work of Shari Smith and an entity called Trio.

Trio pairs books with songwriters and visual artists to create a total package based on a novel. I hadn’t heard of Trio or Shari Smith before, so I was thrilled to learn about this concept at Ms. Mayhew’s book reading in Charlotte.

Many of her high school classmates and other friends from when she lived in Charlotte were there, as well as Catherine Frey, who had assisted Ms. Mayhew with her research.

Janet Morrison with Anna Jean Mayhew at Park Road Books in Charlotte, NC

I was delighted to renew my acquaintance with Ms. Mayhew. When I got the chance to talk to her at the end of the event, she again offered me encouragement on the writing of my historical novel. She has been an inspiration to me on my journey as a writer.

Since my last blog post

I have enjoyed rewriting several more chapters of The Doubloon (former working title, The Spanish Coin) and forgive me if I toot by own horn here. Since last Monday’s blog I’ve had a net gain of 20,525 words. The current word count is 50,850. I’m more than halfway to the completion of this rough, rough, rough draft of my novel.

Until my next blog post

I hope you have a good book to read.

If you’re a writer, I hope you have productive writing time and your projects are moving right along.

Look for my #TwoForTuesday blog post tomorrow: ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­“Two Books that Make Me Smile.”  Thank you for providing the writing prompt, Rae, in “Rae’s Reads and Reviews” blog. Here’s a link to her April 1, 2019 blog post in which she listed all the #TwoForTuesday prompts for the month of April: https://educatednegra.blog/2019/04/01/april-two-for-tuesday-prompts/.

Thank you for reading my blog. You could have spent the last few minutes doing something else, but you chose to read my blog.

Let’s continue the conversation

Have you read Tomorrow’s Bread, by Anna Jean Mayhew? If so, please share your thoughts in the comments section below or on Facebook.

Have you attended any author book readings or book signings? What do you like best about such events?

Janet

#TwoForTuesday: Two Books with Flowery Language

This week’s writing prompt for Rae’s #TwoForTuesday blog post was a real challenge for me. I don’t tend to read books with flowery language, so I was stumped for a few days.  If you’re interested in participating in Rae’s #TwoForTuesday blog post prompts or want to read what other participants are saying, go to Rae’s blog at ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­https://educatednegra.blog/2019/04/01/april-two-for-tuesday-prompts.

A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens

A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens

Many novels of the 1800s would qualify for today’s #TwoForTuesday prompt, but I decided to go with A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens. You need go no further than the preface to know you’re in for some flowery language.

“I have endeavoured in this Ghostly little book, to raise the Ghost of an Idea, which shall not put my readers out of humour with themselves, with each other, with the season, or with me. May it haunt their houses pleasantly, and no one wish to lay it. Their faithful Friend and Servant, C.D., December, 1843.”

The Presbyterian Congregation on Rocky River, by Dr. Thomas Hugh Spence, Jr.

The Presbyterian Congregation on Rocky River, by Thomas Hugh Spence, Jr.

The first book that came to mind for today’s topic is an excellent nonfiction book by Dr. Thomas Hugh Spence, Jr. You might be familiar with it if you live in the Charlotte area or have ancestors who were or are part of that congregation. It’s a history of Rocky River Presbyterian Church called The Presbyterian Congregation on Rocky River.

Dr. Spence’s father was the pastor of Rocky River Presbyterian Church in Cabarrus County, North Carolina in the 1910s, and Dr. Spence loved that church. He did a yeoman’s job of researching the first 200 years of the life of the congregation. The flowery language Dr. Spence sprinkled throughout this 1954 book endear it to me all the more because it demonstrates his abiding love for the congregation.

After the preface, is a page about the Rocky River and the first church that took the river’s name. I think you’ll agree that the language is a bit flowery.

“The waters of more than two centuries have followed the course of Rocky River toward the Eastern Sea since the vanguard of the Scotch-Irish settled along its banks and branches…. The foundations were laid beyond the seas, amid the verdant valleys of Ulster, or, even earlier, upon the heathered hills of Scotland. But there is no uncertainty in regard to that staunch and sturdy race who made their way across the Atlantic, settled for a season in Pennsylvania, and then resumed the march to rest only intermittently until the Yadkin had been forded and the region of Rocky River attained.”

(This book is available from the Rocky River Presbyterian Church office at 7940 Rocky River Road, Concord, NC 28025. You may contact the church office at 704-455-2479 or churchadmin@rockyriver.org for details. The church’s website is http://rockyriver.org/.)

Until my next blog post

Thank you, Rae, of “Rae’s Reads and Reviews Blog” for this month’s #TwoForTuesday blog post prompts. Visit her blog, https://educatednegra.blog/2019/04/01/april-two-for-tuesday-prompts/.

Happy reading!

Let’s continue the conversation

In the comments section below, tell me about one or two books with flowery language that come to your mind.

Janet

Three Other Books I Read in March 2019

I had so much I wanted to say about the books I read last month, I had to divide my thoughts between two blog posts. Last Monday I wrote about three of the books I read in March [https://janetswritingblog.com/2019/04/01/this-is-not-an-april-fools-day-joke/], so today I write about the other three books.

Jacksonland:  President Andrew Jackson, Cherokee Chief John Ross, and A Great American Land Grab, by Steve Inskeep

Jacksonland, by Steve Inskeep

I can’t remember how I became aware of this book, and I don’t remember what I expected it to be. What it turned out to be was a real eye opener! I consider myself a bit of a student of history, but I had never read the details of how Andrew Jackson speculated on land and grabbed it up by the tens of thousands of acres as a result of the inside track he enjoyed.

The main things I knew about Andrew Jackson were:

  • He was born near the North Carolina – South Carolina border, so both states claim him as theirs;
  • His father died just days before he was born;
  • He was delivered by his Aunt Sarah Hutchinson Lessley, who just happened to be my 5th-great-grandmother;
  • He became famous for his service in the Battle of New Orleans;
  • He was the 7th President of the United States of America;
  • His image appears on the United States $20 bill; and
  • He is blamed for the Cherokee “Trail of Tears” as he forced them off their ancestral lands in western North Carolina and northern Georgia and into a grim and often fatal march to the Oklahoma Territory.

The more I learn about Andrew Jackson, the more I wonder why North and South Carolina fight over him. Let’s just let Tennessee have him, since that’s where he chose to build his estate called The Hermitage. The more I learn about him, the more I wish my ggggg-grandmother had delivered a president of better character. I don’t blame her, though. Her sister, Jean Jackson was in need of a midwife.

What I learned by reading Jacksonland:  President Andrew Jackson, Cherokee Chief John Ross, and A Great American Land Grab, by Steve Inskeep was that President Jackson not only forced the Native Americans off their lands throughout the Southeast, but afterwards he personally gained financially from purchasing thousands of acres of those lands. So did his friends and his wife’s nephew. That’s just the half of it.

Ignorance is bliss. I almost wish I hadn’t read the book.

No, I’m glad I did. I wish I’d known about all this thievery and fraud earlier. It’s amazing the details that are not included or are just mentioned in passing in history textbooks!

The Island of Sea Women, by Lisa See

The Island of Sea Women, by Lisa See

I listened to this historical novel on CD. It is based on the women who live(d) on the island of Jeju off the coast of Korea. The book covers nearly 100 years of life and changes on the island, from the 1930s, through Japanese colonialism, through World War II and the Korean War, to the 21st century.

On Jeju, women learn from a young age how to dive deep into the ocean to harvest certain fish and other sea life. They can hold their breath longer than any other people in the world. They are known as haenyeo. The women do this dangerous work, and their husbands raise their children.

This is a story of friendship and betrayal against a back drop of war and military occupation. I was mesmerized by The Island of Sea Women, by Lisa See.

Due to spending so much time deep in the water, the haenyeo have hearing loss. For this reason, the older women speak loudly. It took me a while to get accustomed to the varying volume of this book on CD, as the narrator went above and beyond the call of duty in demonstrating how much louder the women spoke compared to the other characters. For that reason, it’s not the best choice if you like to listen to a book at bedtime or with ear buds. You, too, could suffer hearing loss!

Jackie Tales:  The Magic of Creating Stories and the Art of Telling Them, by Jackie Torrence

Jackie Tales, by Jackie Torrence

You might recall that I referenced this book in my March 12, 2019 blog post, “Two For Tuesday:  Two Books Written by Women of Color” (https://janetswritingblog.com/2019/03/12/twofortuesday-two-books-written-by-women-of-color/.)

I also referenced The Importance of Pot Liquor, by Jackie Torrence in my blog post on February 19, 2019: “ Two for Tuesday:  Two Books that Remind Me of Someone.” Here’s the link to that post: https://janetswritingblog.com/2019/02/19/two-for-tuesday-two-books-that-remind-me-of-someone/ .

Jackie Torrence was a master storyteller and a reference librarian in High Point, North Carolina. This book includes 16 folk tales along with Ms. Torrence’s stage directions and sidebar comments for each story. I’d never in my life considered being a storyteller until I read this book. I don’t know that this is something I’ll pursue, but the book is so inspiring that it made me entertain the idea!

Even if you just want to be able to read stories to your children or grandchildren with more enthusiasm, facial expression, and use of your hands in a demonstrable way, you can benefit from this book. An alternative title for the book could have been, “The Many Faces of Jackie Torrence” because there are numerous up-close photographs of her extraordinarily expressive face as she told the stories.

In Jackie Tales:  The Magic of Creating Stories and the Art of Telling Them, Ms. Torrence explains what makes a good Jack Tale and what makes a good story. She writes about adjusting stories depending upon the age of her audience and how to (and how not to) hold children’s attention.

If you have an appreciation for the art of storytelling, you will enjoy this book. Look for a copy in used bookstore and online at used bookstores or consortiums such as Advanced Book Exchange.

I read one story each night before going to bed, and I hated to see the book end. It’s one I’ll definitely reread and enjoy just as much the second and third times.

Since my last blog post

I had the pleasure of attending Anna Jean Mayhew’s reading and book signing at Park Road Books in Charlotte on Thursday night. What an enjoyable evening it was as she read from and talked about her latest historical novel, Tomorrow’s Bread. More on that in my blog post on Monday, April 15.

I’ve had a net gain of 8,325 words to my The Doubloon manuscript, bringing my current word count to 30,325. I get to start on Chapter 8 today. I can’t wait!

Until my next blog post

I hope you have a good book to read. I started reading The Irishman’s Daughter, by V.S. Alexander yesterday afternoon. After reading Mr. Alexander’s earlier novels, The Magdalen Girls in 2017 and The Taster last year, I was eager to read his recently-released novel, The Irishman’s Daughter. He writes extraordinary historical fiction.

If you’re a writer, I hope you have quality writing time and your projects are moving right along.

Look for my #TwoForTuesday blog post tomorrow: ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­“Two Books with Flowery Language.”  Thank you for providing the writing prompt, Rae, in “Rae’s Reads and Reviews” blog. Here’s a link to her April 1, 2019 blog post in which she listed all the #TwoForTuesday prompts for the month of April: https://educatednegra.blog/2019/04/01/april-two-for-tuesday-prompts/.

Thank you for reading my blog. You could have spent the last few minutes doing something else, but you chose to read my blog.

Let’s continue the conversation

Have you read any of the three books I talked about today? If so, please share your thoughts with me. Have I piqued your interest in reading any of these books?

What are you reading, and would you recommend it?

Janet

#TwoForTuesday: Two Really Funny Books

I’m participating in the third month of Rae’s Reads and Reviews’ #TwoForTuesday blog prompts. Rae’s blog post yesterday, https://educatednegra.blog/2019/04/01/april-two-for-tuesday-prompts/ lists the prompts for every Tuesday in April. If you’d like to participate, visit Rae’s blog post and leave her a message in the comments section.

Each month’s prompts are more challenging than the ones from the previous month. It remains to be seen if I can come up with books to write about this month. Rae is stretching my memory to think back through my many years of reading.

With today’s theme in mind, I selected two book series instead of two individual books. (There I go, bending the rules again!) They are series I enjoyed a few years ago. They are books you might enjoy when you want something light to read, although after a while they become somewhat predictable.

Janet Evanovich’s Stephanie Plum Series

I appreciate how Ms. Evanovich numbers her books in this series in chronological order. It makes it easy to keep up with where you are in the series, especially if you’re late coming to her books and you want to remember which ones you’ve read.

Stephanie Plum is a bounty hunter for her New Jersey cousin of questionable character. Stephanie is white. Her sidekick is a large black woman named Lula. There’s no end to the trouble Stephanie and Lula get into. This usually involves Stephanie’s car getting blown up and one of her two heart throbs, Ranger, coming to her rescue. The earlier books in this series were fresh and laugh-out-loud funny. After 25 books, though, they don’t make me laugh as much.

One for the Money, by Janet Evanovich

If you want to give Ms. Evanovich’s Stephanie Plum books a try, start with One for the Money in order to get acquainted with the recurring cast of characters. The books don’t have to be read in order, but occasionally knowing what has transpired in the past will help you appreciate a later book.

Ms. Evanovich writes one book every year now in this series, with Look Alive Twenty-Five being released last fall. The Stephanie Plum books are stereotypically-New Jersey.

Ann B. Ross’ Miss Julia Novels

I read a few of Ann B. Ross’ Miss Julia novels a few years ago before I got hooked on historical fiction. That’s not to say they don’t still make me laugh.

Miss Julia Speaks Her Mind, by Ann B. Ross

Miss Julia is an elderly widow who lives in a town in western North Carolina. Every time Miss Julia thinks life might settle down, a relative or other ne’er do well shows up on her doorstep to throw a monkey wrench into her life.

Miss Julia rolls with the punches with good humor. Start with Ann B. Ross’ debut novel, Miss Julia Speaks Her Mind. This is great Southern fiction.

Ironically, Ms. Ross’ latest Miss Julia novel is being published today. The title is Miss Julie Takes the Wheel.

Until my next blog post

Thank you, Rae, of “Rae’s Reads and Reviews Blog” for this month’s #TwoForTuesday blog post prompts. Visit her blog, https://educatednegra.blog.

Happy reading!

Let’s continue the conversation

In the comments section below, tell me about one or two books that made you laugh.

Janet

#TwoForTuesday: Two of my Unsung Female Heroes

Many unsung female heroes have crossed my path. I haven’t known any famous people, so all the heroes in my life – male and female – are unsung.

I’m going to break the “Two-For” rule today and write about just one of my unsung female heroes, my great-great-great-great-grandmother, Mary Morrison. I know her only through names and dates on the written page and a plain rock that marks her grave in Spears Graveyard, but she is my hero.

Mary Morrison (17??-1781)

I know few details of this Mary Morrison’s life. I don’t know if she had a bubbly personality or was a negative person. I only know her from the circumstances of her life.

She was born in Scotland, probably on the Kintyre Peninsula in 1732. She married John Morrison from the same place. They came to America, lived in Pennsylvania for a while, then moved to North Carolina in the 1760s.

Mary and John had nine children. John died in 1777. Tradition tells us that he was ambushed by Tories not far from his and Mary’s home. Knowing that he would soon die, he wrote his will in August of 1777 and died less than a week later. From John’s will, we know that Mary was expecting their last child at the time because he made provisions for the unborn child.

Sadly, Mary died early in 1781, leaving her minor children in the care of relatives. We also know that when Mary was sick and writing her will that one of her daughters was very ill and it was uncertain if the daughter would survive that illness.

What a hard life Mary must have had! I hope she had joy in her life.

I marvel at how she left Scotland for the great unknown American frontier. She left a place on the sea for a new life 200 miles inland in the backcountry of North Carolina where the woods and meadows were filled with all sorts of wild animals about which she knew little or nothing. She must have feared every day for disease or injury to herself and her family.

I live on land today that has been passed down from generation to generation from John and Mary. I came to feel a real kinship with Mary a few years ago as I worked in our vegetable and flower garden.

Summer Squash
Dragonfly in our garden

I practiced organic gardening, much as Mary would have in the 1770s. I imagined Mary growing some of the same vegetables and varieties of flowers on this same land. I enjoyed the butterflies, writing spiders, hoppy toads, dragonflies, birds, and box turtles that visited the garden, and I liked to think that Mary did, too.

As I was always on the lookout for copperhead snakes while in my garden, I can’t help but think Mary kept an eye open for them, too. One of the earliest things my parents taught me was how to distinguish between a copperhead and a non-poisonous snake. I feel sure that was an early lesson Mary and John taught their children. Also, how to identify and avoid poison oak.

I can imagine Mary showing her children how to pluck a honeysuckle blossom, bite the end of the stem off, and suck in the sweetness of the flower.

Passion Flower

When wild passion flowers sprouted in her garden, I hope she left them to grow, bloom, and produce lollypops.

When the wild orange butterfly weed bloomed in sunny spots in the yard, I hope Mary showed her children the black, yellow, and white-striped caterpillars munching on the green leaves, and I hope she knew to tell them that those caterpillars would one day be transformed into brilliant Monarch butterflies.

Wild Butterfly Weed and Monarch Butterfly Caterpillars

Mary did not have benefit of a tractor to till her garden, comfortable 21st century clothing to wear in the summer sun, or an air-conditioned house to retreat to when the heat and humidity got the best of her or when her back ached or blisters rose on the palms of her hands.

Raccoon in our yard on April 28, 2014.

I gardened because I wanted to. Mary gardened because she had to. If deer trampled her corn or raccoons raided her apple trees, it could be a matter of life or death for her family. When it happened to me, I just got mad and bought corn and apples at the supermarket.

When the deer and raccoons decided to eat all the plants in my garden, I raised the white flag of surrender and stopped gardening. Mary didn’t have the luxury of stopping. In fact, she probably didn’t have the luxury of stopping for a single day of her life. She could never stop working hard or worrying about her family.

My heart breaks to think of her on her death bed in March of 1781, writing her will, and wondering what would become of her orphaned children.

When I get to Heaven, I will sit down with Great-Great-Great-Great-Grandmother Mary Morrison and hear all about her life and her garden.

Grandmother, you’re my hero!

Until my next blog post

Thank you, Rae, of “Rae’s Reads and Reviews Blog” for this month’s #TwoForTuesday blog post prompts. I learned about her prompts in her January 8, 2019 blog post:  https://educatednegra.blog/2019/01/08/two-for-tuesday-prompts/comment-page-1/#comment-1646.

I look forward to seeing what Rae has in store for us in April. If you’d like to participate, visit her blog and tell her you’re interested.

Let’s continue the conversation

In the comments section below, tell me about one or two of your unsung female heroes.

Thank you for taking the time to read my blog today.

Janet